Scientific carbon dating

Accoya offers unparalleled performance in this application, replacing tropical hardwood.

Decking: Applications like decking, where the wood is frequently wet and close to or in contact with the ground, demand a durable wood that is an effective durable and has an insect barrier.

Indeed, it is so reliable that for many years it has been – and continues to be – used by scientists as the benchmark against which other treatments and modified timbers are measured.

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Tests have shown a reduction in swelling caused by moisture uptake of 75% or more.

From oven dry to water saturated conditions, the swelling and shrinkage of acetylated wood is only minimal and, in fact, better than tropical hardwoods.

Accoya wood’s superior dimensional stability (resistance to swelling and shrinkage) matches or exceeds all the best species in the world, including Teak, Sapele, Iroko and Western Red Cedar.

Accoya wood offers outstanding dimensional stability in both radial and tangential directions (thickness and width) meaning that it has minimal swell and shrinkage and may be confidently used in applications where it will encounter varying moisture conditions – even in freshwater immersion.

Extensive laboratory and field testing by leading institutes around the world (including in New Zealand, USA, UK, Sweden, Malaysia, Indonesia, the Netherlands and Japan) has shown the performance of acetylated wood to be extremely reliable.

Accoya® treated wood has been thoroughly tested for dimensional stability, durability, paint retention and in-ground conditions to ensure optimal performance.

Acetylation has been shown to significantly improve performance against brown rot, white rot and soft rot.

Accoya wood has also proven to be an effective barrier to wood destroying insect damage in multiple field tests and laboratory trails undertaken in many locations in the world.

This includes tests with multiple species of termites.

Dimensional stability can be defined as the degree to which a material maintains its original dimensions when subjected to environmental changes.

Rot causes wood to degrade – particularly when it is used outdoors and exposed to moisture – limiting its service life.

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