The dating channel music

For a time, even country music videos aired in a one-hour block during the afternoons.

As an added touch to make the network more like a televised radio station, the early years of the network featured jingles in their bumpers produced by JAM Creative Productions in Dallas, who had previously made jingles for radio stations worldwide.

The format left room for occasional ad-libs by the VJ, a godsend for emcees such as Imus and O'Donnell.

It was originally created by Warner-Amex Satellite Entertainment, at the time a division of Warner Communications and the original owner of MTV, and launched on January 1, 1985 in the former space of Turner Broadcasting System's short-lived Cable Music Channel.

The original purpose of the channel was to build upon the success of MTV by playing music videos, but targeting a slightly older demographic than its sister channel, focusing on the lighter, softer side of popular music.

Its early on-camera personalities were New York radio veterans Don Imus (then of WNBC), Frankie Crocker (then program director and DJ for WBLS), Scott Shannon (of WHTZ), Jon Bauman ("Bowzer" from Sha Na Na), Bobby Rivers, and Rita Coolidge.

Later VJs included Tim Byrd of WPIX-FM (the current day FM rebroadcast of WFAN), a station whose eclectic ballad-and-R&B oriented format mirrored that of VH-1, and Alison Steele ("The Nightbird" of WNEW-FM).

After A-list actress, Alex Allen, has an epic Hollywood meltdown and is dumped on the red carpet before her latest movie premiere, she is in desperate need of some positive publicity in order to save her reputation as "America's sweetheart." Salvation comes in the form of a small town boy's video "Promposal" in which the student invites Alex to his high school prom.

Sure enough, when the video goes viral, it scores the kid a date with his celebrity crush.

More recently, much like MTV, VH1 has been in the area of reality television programming, such as Behind the Music, the I Love…

series and the Celebreality block of programming, as part of the channel's current focus on programming primarily aimed towards women.

Also frequently featured in the network's early years were "videos" for Motown and other 60s oldies consisting of newsreel and concert footage.

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